Information gleaned from a dating site crossword

This has, of course, unleashed a torrent of speculation, though with not a shred of external evidence to back any of it up.

Also: one unusual feature of Boxall’s copy of the Rubaiyat is that the nurse had apparently signed it “Jestyn”, though her name at the time was actually Jessica Ellen Harkness.

All the same, when she was later shown the plaster cast bust of the dead man, she was “” (Feltus, p.178), giving rise to a strong suspicion that she knew more than she was letting on.

The phone number X3239 turned out to be that of a nurse called Jessica Ellen Thomson (née Harkness) living at 90A Glenelg Street, not far from the same beach.

When quizzed by the police at the time, she said that she did not know who the deceased was.

Tucked into a tiny fob pocket in the dead man’s trousers was a small scrap of printed paper ripped out of a book: mysteriously, it contained the Persian phrase (i.e. This was quickly recognized as being the final words of the Rubaiyat of Omar Khayyam, quite a popular book at the time.

And then some months later, a particular copy of the Rubaiyat surfaced with part of the final “Tamam Shud” page removed: it was claimed that the book had been thrown into a car parked near the same beach where the man had been found.

Oddly, there was a half-smoked cigarette in his mouth on the beach, which (when taken together with the lividity) would strongly suggest that the corpse had been actively posed by person or persons unknown.

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